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B2B Customer Satisfaction: The Seven Point Plan

seven-point B2B customer satisfaction plan to help you keep your B2B customers on board.We all know it is much cheaper to keep existing customers than to find new ones.  You need to choose what customers to focus on, you need to then set expectation levels, you need to communicate these levels to your team and your customers, you need to monitor and measure these levels, you need to be prepared to change if needed and most important you need to do as you said you would!

So here is our seven-point B2B customer satisfaction plan to help you keep your B2B customers on board.

 1.  Choose What Customers to Focus On

It can be tempting to pursue every opportunity you see.  Take a step back.  What do you know you can do competently and successfully?  What are you less sure of?  Weigh up the risks and opportunities on offer.  If you find the client or contract is a good fit for your business, then you stand a good chance of keeping the customer satisfied.  If it is not a good fit, do you really want to get involved?

2.  Set Expectations

It is great to be able to say ‘Yes, we can do that’ when a customer asks a question.   Make sure you clarify requirements in detail first, then work out what is logistically and financially possible before you make a commitment.  That way, you can agree a clear specification that works for both you and for the client.  Your customer will know what to expect, and you will be able to deliver on your promises.

3.  Communicate With Your Team

Celebrate the new business – then explain the full details to the people on the ground.  Share the paperwork, where it is useful. Talk about why, as well as how.  When people understand the need for a particular deadline or unusually complex feature, they will be more motivated to deliver.  Sharing the important details for a new order in a one-page summary is good practice.

4.  Communicate With Your Customer

You might be doing everything expected and more – but until your efforts are visible to the customer, they will worry.  Report progress at agreed intervals, talk about any issues that arise, and do not tuck problems under the carpet and hope they will go away.  They rarely do.

5.  Monitor and Measure

Track what is going on against what matters to you and what matters to the customer. Get feedback from them.  It is important you both get what you need.  If a contract isn’t working for you, the quality of what you deliver is at risk.

6. Be Prepared to Change

Use feedback and track your performance to stimulate ideas for change. Watch what your competitors are doing, and what is going on in the outside world, and plan accordingly.  Review your approach, and consider whether it is working most effectively to meet client needs. Keep ahead of the game, and your customers will be confident you can keep meeting their needs.

7. Do What you Said you Would

The big one. Get the basics right. Focus on getting the job done to the standards and specification agreed. That is what you’re being paid for. Be consistent, maintain quality, and do not let people down, and you will build both a solid base of satisfied customers and a reputation that brings you new business.

If you would like more to see some useful business tools that can help you achieve this please click below or contact a specialist:

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